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Providence Reformed Baptist Church
Stephen Nutter  |  Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Sermon9/15/14 2:38 AM
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“ Summary, Part 4 (final) ”
PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS [30:33]: 1. Heaven is a real place where Christ now is. It is not a figment of man’s imagination. 2. We are called to reverent worship. How we prepare ourselves for the highest dignitary should not compare to how we prepare ourselves for God’s presence. Church shouldn’t entertain men; it should entertain God. 3. The godly are comforted in their trials and afflictions. The Lord will never leave or forsake us in our troubles. 4. It emboldens God’s servants in danger and difficulty. The Christian response to trial is far different than the worldly one. We have a God who works all to our good, but how does the unbeliever respond to his trials? 5. It urges Christians to keep their bodies free from sexual impurity. Holiness isn’t just an attitude of mind, but a way of observable life. 6. It requires churches to separate from the wicked. The standard of holiness has not changed from Paul’s day. It is discouraging how many churches today seek to win the lost by adopting their attitudes. Do they not have the same Bible to which Paul contributed? 7. We are called to glory in the deity and sufficiency of Jesus Christ, the very one who is in our presence. 8. It moves us to desire to be with Christ in heaven. To be absent from the body is to be present with the Lord.

Sermon9/15/14 2:37 AM
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“ Summary, Part 3 ”
2. THAT NO TRUE CHRISTIAN SHOULD JOIN OR REMAIN IN A CHURCH FELLOWSHIP WITH A SOCIETY OF WICKED MEN [20:25]. True Christians should sever their ties with apostate churches. God does not expect an elect to suffer the darkness of an impure body, but to leave and find a pure one. 3. THAT EACH TRUE CHURCH SHOULD SEPARATE FROM THE UNGODLY AND THEIR WICKED WAYS [21:13]. It should not receive the unsaved into membership, and should discipline members who fall astray of any basic tenet of the faith. This requires vigilance, diligence, and courage, but most of all the exaltation of God and not popularity. Pastors who practice this kind of zealousness tend to never lose their church no matter how much resistance they endure, even from their own flock. Jesus did not cleanse the Temple with diplomacy, but with holy anger at what had been done to His Father’s house. How would Jesus respond to the typical church in America today? E. COLOSSIANS 2:9 [27:30]. This text states the complete sufficiency of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Sermon9/15/14 2:33 AM
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“ Summary, Part 2 ”
B. 1 CORINTHIANS 3:16-17 [8:21]: Christ’s special presence in His church. The church house becomes holy as God’s people gather there. We should never forget that we are on holy ground when we participate in church life. Sadly, we are more tolerant of the desecration of the church than God is. We are the temple of God, but what kind of temple are we? Are we white hot or lukewarm? C. 1 CORINTHIANS 6:19 [12:02]: the Christian as a temple. We are not His by creation, but by new creation. God cannot be glorified by a Christian who gives his body to sin. D. 2 CORINTHIANS 6:14-7:1 [14:37]. The righteous should not join in Christian fellowship with the wicked, who threaten and violate the identity of the church. They are invited to attend so that they may be convicted, saved, and then joined to the church. This principle calls our attention to three things: 1. THAT NO TRUE CHURCH SHOULD FELLOWSHIP WITH SOCIETIES OF WICKED MEN [18:01]. This includes those who deny the deity of Christ or who promote ungodly behavior such as homosexuality. Parachurch organizations are often a source of this. Congregations that don’t avoid this are prone to welcoming wickedness into the fellowship and bringing judgment on their churches.

Sermon9/15/14 2:32 AM
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“ Summary, Part 1 ”
[Pastor Nutter credits his former professor, Pastor Greg Nichols of Grace Immanuel Reformed Baptist Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the outline of this message, which can be found in Pastor Nichols’ book, *What does the Bible say about God?: The Biblical doctrine of God*.] In this message, we continue from last week to examine the biblical witness to God’s special presence: what does the Bible say about it? III. SURVEY OF THE BIBLICAL WITNESS TO GOD’S SPECIAL PRESENCE. This survey is hardly exhaustive, but we will examine five key texts. A. GENESIS 28:17 [starting at 3:52 of the audio]. God’s emphatic presence was with Jacob at Bethel, and feared Jacob. Our demeanor in God’s house should not be flippant, carnal, or casual, but sincere and reverent. How much do we need to hear this message today! A true church is a place of God’s special presence, and casualness there—in dress and attitude— is a curse in today’s church.

Sermon9/9/14 5:43 AM
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“ Summary, Part 4 (final) ”
CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS [49:05]. 1. The grace of God that brings salvation brings a radical change in a person’s life. This refutes the belief that a forgiven person can go on living in wickedness. 2. Any hope of Christ’s return that does not motivate a life of practical godliness is a false and deluding hope. Do we look for translation from our sins as much as we look for translation from this life? 3. Christians are not their own; they belong to the Lord. He saved us to serve Him. Salvation doesn’t just deliver us from Hell, but fits us for Heaven. 4. Christ came to save sinners, sinners of every kind.

Sermon9/9/14 5:42 AM
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“ Summary, Part 3 ”
C. THE SACRIFICIAL FOUNDATION FOR GOD’S SAVING GRACE (verse 14, “who gave Himself for us”) [40:03]. All these blessing point to the one who gave Himself so we may give ourselves to Him. This statement entails that His sacrifice was intentional: He wasn’t murdered against His will; it was special, done for a special people: the elect; and it was fruitful, producing a special effect in those people, primarily their salvation. D. THE OBSERVABLE EFFECTS OF GOD’S SAVING GRACE [43:40]. Negatively: that He might redeem us from every lawless deed and to be zealous for good deeds. A fruitful Christian is one who learns to engage in good works. Positively: that He might produce purified, consecrated Christians for Himself. It is imperative for the Christian to openly own these blessings and not apologize for them. Christ died not only to make us forgiven, but to make us good.

Sermon9/9/14 5:42 AM
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“ Summary, Part 2 ”
B. THE TRANSFORMING POWER OF GOD’S SAVING GRACE (verse 12) [21:07]. It delivers us from the power of sin to the power of God’s discipline and instruction. 1. IT TRANSFORMS A CHRISTIAN’S CHARACTER AND CONDUCT [22:30]. Negatively, it transforms self-indulgence into self-denial. It teaches us to say no to ungodliness: we once suppressed the truth, rejected the faith, and indulged the flesh. It also teaches us to say no to worldly desires. The world is hostile to God; its driving principles glorify the flesh and not God. But Christians are merely in the world, not of it. Positively, it transforms Christians’ relations to others and to God. It reorients our lives toward pleasing God. In ourselves, we turn from self-indulgence to self-control. Toward others, we conform to God’s moral law: where we were once hateful, opportunistic, and self-interested, we turn toward fidelity and charity. Toward God, we turn from vanity toward reverence and holiness. 2. IT TRANSFORMS A CHRISTIAN’S PRESENT HOPE AND FUTURE PROSPECTS [33:54]. Where we once feared Christ’s return, we now look forward to it eagerly. It is now a blessed hope and a holy homecoming. This holy longing begets holy living.

Sermon9/9/14 5:41 AM
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“ Summary, Part 1 ”
[Pastor Nutter credits his former professor, Pastor Greg Nichols of Grace Immanuel Reformed Baptist Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the outline of this message, which can be found in Pastor Nichols’ book, *What does the Bible say about God?: The Biblical doctrine of God*.] It is remarkable that God’s grace is greater than our sin. In this message, we examine the power influence and obvious effects of God’s saving grace by way of Titus 2:11-14. A. THE GLORIOUS APPEARANCE OF GOD’S SAVING GRACE (verse 11) [starting at 6:30 of the audio]. This not God’s common grace, which He bestows upon all men, but the effectual grace of salvation, which delivers men from their sin. 1. Its glorious scope [8:11]. It reaches every race, nation, age, and both genders, thus leaving no category beyond its reach. We should regard no sinner’s case as hopeless. 2. Its glorious display [13:00]. It delivers us from guilt and penalty, sin’s power and domination, cleanses us from moral defilement, delivers us from the enslaving power of the world and the power of the devil, liberates us from the fear of death, spiritually resurrects us, and teaches us how to conduct our lives after salvation.

Sermon9/9/14 3:33 AM
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Sermon:
The Spirituality of God, 2 of 2
Stephen Nutter
3
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“ Summary, Part 3 (final) ”
2. HIS SPIRITUALITY CALLS US TO WORSHIP HIM IN TRUTH [50:13], which is His word, especially the Gospel. The Gospel liberates us from the Levitical format given to the Jews and into the spiritual priesthood. Divine revelation, not human tradition, defines how we are to draw near to Him. CONCLUDING QUESTIONS [56:23]: 1. Does God’s supreme spirituality enter your thoughts when you come to worship Him? 2. Do you see how irreverent is formalistic or creative worship? 3. Do you understand that worshipping God acceptably is not something peripheral to the Christian life?

Sermon9/9/14 3:33 AM
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Sermon:
The Spirituality of God, 2 of 2
Stephen Nutter
3
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“ Summary, Part 2 ”
God’s capacity to feel is unoriginated, eternal, ideal, perfect, pure, absolute, immutable. He does have emotions, but they are not to be mistaken for human emotions. His are exalted. 4. HIS DIVINE MORALITY [33:36]. Only God is morally ideal: He can never be morally improved or tarnished. He is incapable of flaw (yes, there are things God cannot do): He can never look upon evil with favor, let alone commit it. Even the heavens are not pure in His sight. He cannot be tempted by evil, nor can He tempt to evil. 5. HIS DIVINE PERSONALITY (His triunity) [38:55]. Even before the creation, God could have holy communion; He can never be lonely. Thus He didn’t create us for companionship with Him. No other personality is like this. B. THE EXPERIENTIAL IMPORTANCE OF GOD’S SPIRITUALITY [42:45]. In Jn 4:24, the Lord is stressing this practical principle. In the passage, He addressed the timeless religious misunderstanding that worship is prefaced by place and tradition. True worship is rooted in God’s nature, and He seeks and requires worship in spirit and truth. What does this mean? 1. HIS SPIRITUALITY CALLS US TO WORSHIP HIM IN SPIRIT [48:39]: that is, with our hearts and entire souls in sincerity and not empty ritual, which God condemns.

Sermon9/9/14 3:32 AM
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Sermon:
The Spirituality of God, 2 of 2
Stephen Nutter
3
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“ Summary, Part 1 ”
[Pastor Nutter credits his former professor, Pastor Greg Nichols of Grace Immanuel Reformed Baptist Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the outline of this message, which can be found in Pastor Nichols’ book, *What does the Bible say about God?: The Biblical doctrine of God*.] In this message, we look at the things that uniquely true of God as a supreme Spirit [starting at 4:10 of the audio]. Though spirits have communicable traits, divine spirituality is incommunicable. God is supreme in His faculties. So we consider things that are true of His spirituality alone. A. DIVINE INCORPOREALITY [12:36]. This means immaterial: without a body. 1. HIS MAJESTIC FORM [13:05]. He is thus invisible, indivisible, impassible (without appetites), and indissoluble (permanent). 2. HIS DIVINE ANIMACY (His power) [16:00]. He is unoriginated, omnipotent, immortal, immutable, and ideal. 3. HIS DIVINE FACULTY (His supreme mind, will, and affection) [22:00]. His understanding is infinite and exalted (“My thoughts are not your thoughts”); By His will, He works all things to its purpose; none of them fail, and none are changed by anyone. It is absolute: without cause or restraint. His exalted will is understood as God’s sovereignty.

Sermon9/8/14 4:33 AM
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Sermon:
God's Absolute Perfection
Stephen Nutter
4
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“ Summary, Part 4 (final) ”
B. THE PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF HIS INFINITE FLAWLESSNESS [51:27]. 1. It calls us to humble and contrite submission to whatever He ordains in our lives. 2. It calls us to trust in His integrity, not to blame Him for temptation or sin, even though we cannot understand how He sovereignly controls temptation or sinners. 3. It calls us to strive to imitate his flawless character. He is not only a heavenly Father, but a model Father.

Sermon9/8/14 4:32 AM
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Sermon:
God's Absolute Perfection
Stephen Nutter
4
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“ Summary, Part 3 ”
3. MT 5:48 [39:56]. God’s perfection is the standard of Christian obedience and behavior. Though we can’t hope to satisfy it, Christ makes no sense if this is not what this means. God’s ideality has profound implications for Christian ethics. Sinless perfection is communicable, but perfection is not. 4. JAS 1:13 [42:58]. God is inherently incapable of sin. Again, only faith in God’s word resolves the tension of God controlling Satan without any responsibility for Satan’s actions. II. SUMMARY OF THE PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF GOD’S IDEALITY [46:01]. A. THE PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF HIS INEXHAUSTIBLE SUFFICIENCY [46:45]. 1. It calls us to praise Him for making our lives complete. 2. It calls us not to second-guess Him, but rather to fear Him. 3. It calls us to give Him all the credit for all we have. 4. It calls us to trust and ask Him to supply all our material and spiritual needs. 5. It calls us to cling to Christ for all we need and beware whatever draws us away from Him.

Sermon9/8/14 4:31 AM
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Sermon:
God's Absolute Perfection
Stephen Nutter
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“ Summary, Part 2 ”
I. SURVEY OF THE BIBLICAL WITNESS TO GOD’S IDEALITY (HIS ABSOLUTE PERFECTION) [17:31]. A. BEHOLD THE BIBLICAL WITNESS TO GOD’S INEXHAUSTIBLE SUFFICIENCY. 1. PS 18:30-32 [18:11]. Because God is perfect, we can safely depend upon Him, even for our own perfection. Not sinless perfection, but evangelical obedience as completeness. From our perspective, we don’t see our lives as the complete tapestry God made them to be. 2. ECC 3:14 [24:16]. All God does is ideal, since God Himself is ideal. We cannot improve His work. 3. ROM 11:35-36 [26:07]. God is in debt to no one and needs nothing from anyone. 4. EPH 1:22-23 [27:36]. God lacks nothing. 5. COL 2:8-9 [30:33]. Christ is ideal (which makes this a good passage to share with Jehovah’s Witnesses). Everything we need is found in Christ. Humanistic philosophy doesn’t teach this. B. BEHOLD THE BIBLICAL WITNESS TO GOD’S INFINITE FLAWLESSNESS [32:56]. 1. JOB 4:17-18, 15:1-16 [33:31]. Compared to God, even the heavens are unclean and the angels are foolish. Our own charge from this is to walk humbly. We have no right to complain to God about our misfortunes. 2. HAB 1:13 [37:31]. Why does God use the godless to chastise His people, or at all for that matter? Trust in God resolves the tension. Faith doesn’t end the mystery; it only diffuses it.

Sermon9/8/14 4:31 AM
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Sermon:
God's Absolute Perfection
Stephen Nutter
4
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“ Summary, Part 1 ”
[Pastor Nutter credits his former professor, Pastor Greg Nichols of Grace Immanuel Reformed Baptist Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the outline of this message, which can be found in Pastor Nichols’ book, *What does the Bible say about God?: The Biblical doctrine of God*.] INTRODUCTION [starting at 1:25 of the audio]. ‘Existential’ refers to existence. Existential properties, then, refer to the general parameters of existence: completion, dependence, limitation, origin, duration, and alteration. Thus, we define God’s existential attributes when we answer these very questions about His being. When God created the universe, He entered relations into the things He made. When we thus distinguish absolute and relative attributes, we must exercise great caution. It would be wrong to say that it is absolutely necessary for God to be omnipresent in space, or ever-present in time. In all this, we must uphold God’s unchangeableness. He does not change. Thus, we expound God’s existential attributes in terms of His relations to space, time, creatures, and sin. God’s ideality is His inherent and infinite perfection. ‘Perfect’ means complete and flawless.

Sermon9/8/14 2:16 AM
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“ Summary, Part 3 (final) ”
2. CONSIDER THE DISTILLED ESSENCE OF GOD’S IMMANENCE (vv. 27-28) [32:34]. Paul points out the analogy between how dependent children relate to parents and how dependent men relate to God. III. CONSIDER THE PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS OF GOD’S INDEPENDENCE [34:56]. A. The general implication: men must repent (vv. 29-31). B. The specific implications: 1. To worship only God, not His creatures. 2. To humbly recognize that God doesn't need us. C. The specific implications of God’s immanence: 1. To be grateful to God for our life and possessions. 2. To acknowledge our complete dependence on God. 3. To courageously fear God more than we fear men. In conclusion: how many are the sermons that teach that Paul blew it at Athens when he preached philosophy and not Christ crucified. Many who profess the gospel reject God’s sovereignty.

Sermon9/8/14 2:16 AM
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“ Summary, Part 2 ”
II. CONSIDER THE DUAL SUBSTANCE OF GOD’S INDEPENDENCE (Acts 17:24-28) [15:04]. In these verses, Paul proclaims one true God as master and maker of all men. In verses 24-25, Paul proclaims God’s transcendence, and in verses 25-28, His immanence. A. CONSIDER GOD’S TRANSCENDENCE (Acts 17:24-25) [17:54]. The transcendence of God boils down to this: that God--who made the world--runs and controls it. We must not think of God as an impersonal life-force of the material world. B. CONSIDER GOD’S IMMANENCE (Acts 17:25-28) [20:02]. The continuation of the universe and preservation of the creatures require His active involvement. 1. CONSIDER THE TWOFOLD DISPLAY OF GOD’S IMMANENCE (Acts 17:25-27) [21:24]. a. The immanent God provides everything man needs (v. 25). God neither depends on us, nor ignores us, but we depend on God and He supplies our every need. He is not indifferent to human life, but actively involved with our little realm of need and care. He orders all the affairs of men and nations with His sovereign will (Dan 4:35, Eph1:11). Few things evoke as much hostility as God’s sovereignty over human affairs.

Sermon9/8/14 2:15 AM
Ian Migala from Minneapolis, Minnesota  Find all comments by Ian Migala
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“ Summary, Part 1 ”
[Pastor Nutter credits his former professor, Pastor Greg Nichols of Grace Immanuel Reformed Baptist Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan for the outline of this message, which can be found in Pastor Nichols’ book, *What does the Bible say about God?: The Biblical doctrine of God*.] In eternity, God was solitary, but not lonely. Yet God’s aseity is the preface, but not the whole story of His self-existence. It serves as the foundation of His self-existence in history. God’s independence has two prongs: first, He transcends all He has made. That is: He is separate from and exalted above His creatures. This is His ‘transcendence’. Second, He sustains, maintains, and oversees His creatures. They depend completely on His care and are completely under His control. Thus, we refer to this aspect of His independence as His ‘immanence’. I. CONSIDER MEN’S CULPABLE IGNORANCE OF GOD’S IMMANENCE (Acts 17:22-23) [starting at 9:11 of the audio]. In these verses, Paul launches his sermon from the platform of men’s ignorance. The Epicureans denied God’s immanence. The Stoics denied God’s transcendence. Their philosophical speculations and idolatrous superstitions betrayed their blatant ignorance of God (Rom 1:19-21).

Sermon9/8/14 2:00 AM
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“ Summary, Part 3 ”
We cannot actually ascend to heaven or tunnel into the middle of the earth. But if we could, we would find God there. He is also in the uninhabited and even in the dark places. Verse 12 means that darkness does not thwart God at all. 3. PR 15:3 [31:22]. God’s ‘eyes’ are His faculty of perception, not eyes of flesh. He is aware of every sordid thing that sinners do in His world and every good deed that His saints perform for His glory. His omnipresence implies that men should live in the fear of God (cf. Lev 19:14). This is a spur for holy striving and against hypocrisy and bitterness. The perfect judge will judge perfectly. 4. JER 23:24 [38:06]. This text epitomizes all we have seen. It confirms that God is present, with His whole being, in the entire universe. The mountains do not hide those who seek their protection from Him. 5. MT 18:19-20 [41:27]. This text links God’s omnipresence with His special presence. He offers comfort in His presence, as he did for Jacob in prison and for the liberated building the Temple. CONCLUDING APPLICATIONS [44:32]. 1. We are called to fear God and walk sincerely before Him. 2. We are called to wait on God for vindication and validation. 3. We are assured that we are never beyond the range of God’s protection.

Sermon9/8/14 2:00 AM
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“ Summary, Part 2 ”
God is present everywhere in His entirety. Do not confuse this with pantheism. God is everywhere does not infer that everything is God. C. GOD IS SPECIALLY PRESENT ON EARTH, IN SOME PLACES, AND IN HEAVEN [16:54]. God, according to His sovereign good pleasure, specially or emphatically dwells in diverse locations at diverse times. Scripture often refers to these places as “His house” or “His temple”. An example is the Garden of Eden. Jacob: “Surely the Lord is in this place” (Gen 28:16). God was in the tabernacle. Today, He dwells in every true church and Christian. He dwells permanently in Heaven (Col 2:9). Other places, we read of God departing, leaving off, etc. II. Survey of the biblical witness to God’s spatial supremacy [20:02]. A. THE BIBLICAL WITNESS TO GOD’S IMMENSITY AND OMNIPRESENCE. 1. 1 KI 8:22-27 [21:27]. In Acts 17:28, we read of God’s immanence, which is a different quality. The current text better captures the quality at hand. In his dedication to God’s house, Solomon asserts God’s immensity. His temple does not exhaust his special presence, let alone His omnipresence. 2. PS 139:7-12 [24:52]. There is no such thing as a God-forsaken place. Yet how often do we all try to flee from Him? Where God’s Spirit is, there God is. God is in the inaccessible places.

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