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How To Legalize Sharing Copyright Content in 2 days
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 06, 2008
Posted by: Scott McMahan | more..
2,150+ views | 60+ clicks
The tech industry news is full of RIAA and MPAA stories about going after file sharing. Wouldn't it be nice if all file sharing was completely legal, and you could download anything you wanted? Here's how that could happen in 2 days.

VOLUNTARILY REMOVE ALL COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL COMPLETELY FROM ALL FILE SHARING NETWORKS.

The gig is up: The MPAA and RIAA want it both ways. They want file sharing to continue as a way to promote their wares. After all, the news is out that some even use leaked TV shows to see what's popular. At the same time, though, they want going online to be dangerous enough that most people will seriously think about buying copies of what they download. There has to be enough fear to make people want to buy copies of things, but there has to be a low enough chance of getting caught that people don't really care. After all, the RIAA and MPAA have to do something to defend their intellectual property or else their copyrights will be meaningless, but they can't do too much. So ...

If file sharing networks (Limewire, eMule, BitTorrent, etc etc etc) would just voluntarily dispose of all RIAA and MPAA material so that ABSOLUTELY NOTHING by these conglomerates was online, I imagine that it would take about 2 days for file sharing -- i.e. free promotion -- to be legal and encouraged. The copyright holders would probably seed their own works on these networks, actually, to get people to listen again.

The WORST thing that could EVER happen to these people is to be ignored. If they thought no one wanted what they were selling, and wouldn't even steal it, there would be a day of total panic. People would get fired. New blood would appear in major labels. The new management's mission would be to get every kid on the planet set up to download and develop a taste for their music (or TV or whatever).

Don't be fooled. They don't really want all file sharing to stop. They just want enough fear that people will try new music and go buy it.

My recommendation is to start a DON'T EVEN STEAL IT campaign and voluntarily remove all copyrighted material by the RIAA and MPAA from file sharing networks.

Category:  Computers and Web

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